Disaster maps (Apps for America)

I just came across a new Apps for America application that is based on data provided on data.gov mashed with Google Maps and Twitter messages from the region. Here is the information directly from their website:

DisastersMap is a website based on data sourced from data.gov.
The tool is meant to better inform Americans of weather disasters (earthquakes, storms), localizing on the map each of these disasters as well as showing comments on the subject made on Twitter.
DisasterMap illustrates as well the interest of the American Congress in weather disasters, offering data localized on the map thanks to Capitol Words. The map enables you to tweet in real time a disaster with your Twitter account. All data on earthquakes is sourced from the USGS (United States Geographical Survey) and the NWS (National Weather Service).

Disaster Map
Disaster Map
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About Ines Mergel

I am Full Professor of Public Administration at the Department of Politics and Public Administration at University of Konstanz, Germany. Previously, I served as Assistant and then Associate Professor (with tenure) at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, NY. In my research, I focus on informal social networks in the public sector and the adoption and diffusion of digital service innovations in government organizations. I teach classes on social media management, digital government, public management, and social network analysis.

2 thoughts on “Disaster maps (Apps for America)

  1. Thank you for posting this! What do you think about the “apps-for-democracy/america/whatever” trend? Is it viable? Is the business model of doing contests sustainable? Are the apps actually used? Do you have user statistics? Any way of measuring societal impact? Anecdotal evidence of lives saved by an app? Structural impact on governance processes in agencies? Any argument what the macro impact would be, if all data would be freed? What is the overall value (monetary/societal/lives/democracy/etc.) of freeing governmental data? What are the costs (monetary/governance/security)? Who will profit, who loses (as in FOIA is mainly used by businesses)?

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